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ROOTS AND CULTURE... KENKEY and CONKIE

ROOTS AND CULTURE... KENKEY and CONKIE

Postby Admin on Sat Nov 26, 2011 8:15 pm

CONKIE

This is a conkie. My mother called this evening and told me to come for it. In Barbados, we eat conkies as a traditional food around Independence Day which falls on 30th November. They are cooked by steaming them in boiling water while wrapped in banana leaves or plantain leaves. Anyone from southern Ghana should recognise this Caribbean delicacy, which has its roots in the kenkey or dokonu or komi eaten in Ghana.

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KENKEY - Ghana

Kenkey or Dokonu or Komi is a staple dish similar to a sourdough dumpling from the Akan, Ga and Ewe inhabited regions of West Africa, usually served with a soup, stew, or sauce. Areas where Kenkey are eaten are southern Ghana, eastern Côte d'Ivoire, Togo, western Benin and Jamaica. It is usually made from ground corn (maize), like sadza and ugali. Unlike ugali, making kenkey involves letting the maize ferment before cooking. Therefore, preparation takes a few days in order to let the dough ferment. After fermentation, the kenkey is partially cooked, wrapped in banana leaves, corn husks, or foil, and steamed. There are several versions of Kenkey, such as Ga and Fanti kenkey.

CONKIE - Barbados

Conkies are a corn-based, delicacy popular in the West Indies. The ingredients include corn flour, coconut, sweet potato, and pumpkin, and the dough is baked by steaming in banana leaves. Conkies are thought to have originated in West Africa, where a similar type of food known as kenkey is popular in Ghana. In Barbados, conkies were once associated with the old British colonial celebration of Guy Fawkes Day on November 5. In modern Barbados they are eaten during Independence Day celebrations on November 30.

DUCKANOO - Jamaica

Duckunoo or duckanoo, also referred to as tie-a-leaf and blue drawers (draws), is a Jamaican cuisine dessert made from cornmeal, coconut, spices and brown sugar, tied up in a banana leaf. It is cooked in boiling water. Duckunoo is believed to have been brought to the island by Africans as there is a similar item, dokonu, eaten in Ghana.

SOURCES

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conkies

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duckunoo

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenkey

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